Diabetes-related necrosis (diabrenec)


Necrotic wound conditions among diabetes sufferers are at most times treated in the same manner as any other type of wounds, such as those sustained from skin trauma, accidents and fights. Such a manner of treatment is often a 50-50 scenario with a strong likelihood of limb amputation.  

necrotic gangrene cured using raw edible phyto-greens
There is definitely a need for a serious review of current understanding of diabetes-related necrosis. To keep on treating diabrenec as normal skin trauma by using antiseptics, antibiotics, etc and getting a low success rate and yet doggedly utilizing this method year in year out is in fact another incredulous facet of modern medical science. Mycoalkonics confirmed an almost 100% success rate from a method using raw edible phyto-greens.
 
It has somewhat remained a mystery for most non-medical people who care for diabetes sufferers as to why a certain percentage of such sufferers should be afflicted with peripheral vascular disease (PVD), a disorder which affects the organs at the extremities to which the vascular system (blood circulatory system) conveys blood; examples of which are necrotic gangrene in the limbs, notably the legs (including foot pedal and digits), and failure of organs inside the body such as kidneys and eyes.  Is there a serious misguidance in the treatment of diabetes-related necrosis (diabrenec)?  The term diabrenec is coined by Mycoalkonics to segregate diabetes-related skin trauma from the other skin conditions. There is definitely a need for a serious review of current understanding of diabetes-related necrosis.  To keep on treating diabrenec as normal skin trauma by using antiseptics, antibiotics, etc and getting a low success rate and yet doggedly utilizing this method year in year out is in fact another incredulous facet of modern medical science.

Medical science attributes the failure of the opthalmic organ (the eyes) to neuropathy (a pathological condition (disorder) of the neurons) and sometimes vascular-pathy such as artherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. Whatever the explanation as to why diabetics suffer from eye failure, kidney failure and necrosis in their limbs, the fact remains that the two conditions -- diabetes and PVD in a diabetes sufferer -- is one and the same disease according to Mycoalkonics' experience; though Western medical science might not conclusively link the two together.

WitchDogged blindness in 'standard' medical science

We are looking at a strange malady of recalcitrant necrosis which eats into the flesh of limbs, especially below the knee, and yet the standard Western Science treatment is dressing and debridement along the same manner as would be performed on other types of skin trauma.  There are serious questions which beg answers and yet the standard answer is shrugged off as "That's the way it is for diabetics: Wounds don't heal so easily."  But why?

What makes the necrotic wound become so difficult to heal?  What makes the wound take on a 'blackish' hue in most cases?  Why might a septicaemia result despite heavy dosages of antibiotics? The scans of arteries in the legs afflicted with diabrenec wounds usually reveal arteriosclerosis and is arteriosclerosis linked to diabrenec wounds?

Are we blind to the fact that the features of diabrenec wounds have some degree of semblance to wounds sustained from bites caused by poisonous species of creepy-crawlies such as spiders centipedes, scorpions?   Semblance of toxic impact?  If this is so, where does the poison come from?  

The supposed purpose of using antibiotics against the bacteria which feeds on diabrenec wounds fail at most times; and the presumption that pathogenic bacteria is the prime cause for the wounds to turn gangrenous does not hold water at all.  The bacteria could very well be opportunistic rather than the main cause.   We are back to the question: Where could the source of the possible poison be that causes diabrenec?

Mycotoxins

It is too well known that mycotoxins (fungal toxins) have powerful constituents which break down proteins, fats and carbohydrates and thus 'soldier' cells in the human body, not to mention the normal cells, will be destroyed before they can contain myco (fungi) proliferation. In such defense compromised situation, opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, together with pathogenic fungi, will 'feast' on the flesh in the wound as if the flesh is dead matter.

Furthermore, some mycotoxins impact neurons (neurotoxins) and their organic structure are similar to that of neuro-transmitters, thus disrupting the normal functions of neurons; which in turn compromises the special musculature helping blood flow against gravity in the legs (the valves preventing backflow are not the total means for blood to flow against gravity); causing sluggish blood flow in and out of the wound; preventing the body vital defense and repair mechanism to reach the necrotic wound; causing a proliferation of pathogens in the wound and finally the ever-burgeoning necrosis.

In addition and no less important, is this question: Is it pure coincidence that where diabrenec occurs, say in the legs, arteriosclerosis of arteries or some sort of arterial constriction will be revealed under non-invasive scans of the legs?  Mycotoxins have been shown to adversely impact vascular systems through inflammation, constriction, and blockages.  <More about blockages>

Using raw edible phyto-green as salve

Do not pooh-pooh the use of  phyto-greens in treating diabrenec. If the 'suspicion' that myco (fungi) and mycotoxins (fungi toxins) are at work in diabrenec, then natural raw edible phyto-greens which are rich in natural anti-fungals, anti-viral and anti-bacterial should work to counter these microbes and afford the body a chance to heal the wound. If this method does not work, then the 'suspicion' lacks substance.

The good news is that the method works. So? This is another case of internal pathogenic fungi as the root cause of D.E.A.T.H., or degnerative early attack on total health.

We have seen hundreds of success stories from the use of phyto-greens in treating diabrenec and of course diabetes itself. We avoided the use of chemicals, laboratory-synthesized antiseptics, antibiotics, etc.  Mycoalkonics has put to the test a wild edible phyto-green called Phyla Nodiflora and it worked beyond doubt.  Grab a fistful of the herb; wash it; add about 2 tablespoons of clean water; blend them into a pulp; apply the mushy pulp on a cotton as a salve; dab the salve directly onto the diabrenec wound. Secure using standard dressing.  Change every 8-12 hours. The amount of herb to be used will depend on the gravity of the wound and how extensive it is. There is no exact dosage since we are not talking about imbibing the herb.  Just ensure you blend enough green pulp to cover the wound or wounds.  Repeat applying the salve until wound does not show signs of gangrene.  Once at this stage the wound will heal naturally with proper care and dressing.

The good news is that Mycoalkonics also discovered that Phyla Nodiflora is not the only herb which beats diabrenec hands down. A potpourri of phyto-greens, such as listed in this site can do the job too.  What is the 'something' which is common among Phyla Nodiflora and other phyto herbs?  Chlorophyll?  Is chlorophyll anti-fungal and anti-microbes such as bacteria and viruses?  It could very well be; and by the way, chlorophyll does not exist alone per se in phyto-material, but is surrounded by phyto-nutrients such as alkaloids, phenolics, and saponins; and the anti-fungal components might come from this phyto-compounds.

Imbibing raw edible phyto-green juice

As the suspected primary cause of diabrenec is found inside the body, the pathogens inside the body should be countered by using the freshly pressed juice from raw edible phyto-greens.  Do visit this site to view a sample of the wide range of greens that can be used as a periodical greens juice regiment.

Method to make salve for dressing diabrenec wounds

Let's say you are dealing with a diabrenec wound of dimension 1.5 inch x 1.5 inch. The variety of phyto leaves used in this example is not cast in stone; you can use various types of edible phyto-greens.  But we found that certain phyto-greens work better due to certain observable features of such greens:
  1. High in chlorophyll (deep green) and is evidenced by the fact that the blended pulp remains green even after 1-2 hours.  Some other greens turn ochre or even blackish due to oxidation.
  2. A strong smell of the chlorophyll in the blended pulp; the smell is like freshly 'cut grass'.
  3. A thick foam results from the blended pulp.
Preparing the salve
  1. Get your hands on any 4-5 of the following anti-fungal raw edible phyto-greens. 
  2. (Note: Those mark with asterisks are the priority herbs mentioned above. See points #1, #2, #3 preceding this section.  The higher number of asterisks the higher the priority.)
  3. Wash leaves and put into blender; add about 5-7ml water.
  4. Blend. Spread the pulp on a piece of cotton to make a salve. Apply the salve directly on the wound.
  5. Secure using bandage.  The fact is that Mycoalkonics uses a plastic wrapper instead of breathable bandage, simply becase we found that the action of the green pulp works better while still wet.  
  6. Change dressing every 6-8 hours.
  7. Repeat until the open wound shows signs of recovery (re-growth of flesh).

Important Notes
  1. Healing Crisis: Since pathogenic fungi are highly suspect to be the target you are dealing with, which are incidentally live organisms, you will at one point, say about 5-10 days into the therapy, that the wound do not seem to show signs of healing.  This is what is mentioned as 'healing crisis' when it is actually the pathogenic organisms 'fighting back'. At this stage the diabrenec wounds do not seem to get better or might even look like they are getting worse.  Do not be afraid. Keep up the greens salve and you will see results after this brief 'healing crisis' period.
  2. Persistence: Another important point to remember about the behaviour of pathogenic fungi is this:  The fungi are stubborn and do not easily give up even in the face of strong natural phyto-green anti-fungals.  So you have to be determined ('stubborn') too; and stick with the protocol day-in-day-out.  It is a matter of time when the pathogens will give up.  Note here that the diabetic patient has to imbibe greens juice too (see above).
  3. Keep salve wet: Standard dressing practice is to use breathable gauze and bandage to secure the salve.  However, Mycoalkonics method is not 'standard' and Mycoalkonics has to steer away from the 'standard' simply because the greens salve works better while still moist.  Thus, Mycoalkonics recommends polyethylene wrapping film.
  4. Slow but sure: This method might be slow but it is slow-and-steady-towards-100%-success.  The protocol has to be doggedly followed.
  5. Fresh is best: Freshly blended raw edible phyto-greens is the best; the use of refrigerated blended phyto-greens should be avoided as far as possible.

Spread the blended greens on a strip of cotton wool
This diabrenec wound can potentially turn gangrenous if
treated using the standard protocol for normal wounds. The
purplish hue is caused by bacterial action on the infected
area which produces hydrogen sulfide gas.  An extreme
case of this condition where a distinct purplish coloration
is evident
will be referred to as gas gangrene.

Spread the blended greens on a strip of cotton wool
Apply the blended greens (pulp) onto a strip of cotton wool.

The salve ready to be applied directly on the diabrenec wound
The salve ready to be applied directly on the wound.

Vicinity areas around the wound need to be applied with the salve too
Vicinity areas around the wound need to be applied
with the salve too.

Secure using polyethylene wrapping film
Securing the salve using polyethylene wrapping film.
See note at the bottom on choice of dressing wrap.

Wounds can heal but the skin might be of a darker hue.
Removing the dressing and washing down is easier
using a water jet in the bathroom; or you may
use a mobile basin instead.
Wounds can heal but the skin might be of a darker hue.

Wounds can heal but the skin might be of a darker hue.
You will know that a diabrenec wound has stopped
being necrotic when you discern a whitish circular
ring arouind the open sore.  But, don't stop here.
Continue the protocol until the reddish open sore
become closed. 

Wounds can heal but the skin might be of a darker hue.
After about 8 days.

Wounds can heal but the skin might be of a darker hue.
Another 5 days later.

Wounds can heal but the skin might be of a darker hue.
Another 6 days later.

Wounds can heal but the skin might be of a darker hue.
Another 7 days later.

Wounds can heal but the skin might be of a darker hue.
Another 5 days later.


Choice of dressing wrap

There could be some trepidation in using non-breathable
material such as polyethylene wrap instead of breathable
dressing linen. We have tried using dressing linen wrap
before and the result was successful too. The choice
between using breathable and non-breathable dressing
wrap is a personal experience, since we have used both
before. If you are unsure of using non-breathable wrap,
you can stick with breathable linen; but you can try using
the non-breathable wrap once a while to find out whether
it suits your purpose. Our purpose of using the
non-breathable wrap is to prevent the green salve from
drying up which make it less effective.  We understand
that the non-breathable wrap might not be suitable
for regions of limbs of which the skin (epidermis) is
delicate and potentially become wrinkled from soggy
conditions.

Linen wrap
You are advised to use standard breathable linen wrap if you
are unsure of using non-breathable wrap.


Pictures of herbs

Updated: Aug 16 2012